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Saturday, February 25, 2017

How to spit and blow your nose

I have a rare form of "upper-GERD", which means I must spit and blow my nose a lot after meals. I have learned on my own, how to spit and blow my nose for maximum effectiveness and minimum harm to the body. I think this will benefit anyone with a cold or congestion problems:

How to spit: (exercise, Mucinex, steam, sniffing fresh onion, peppermint inhalers, and marijuana all loosen up mucus.)

Massage your tummy and beat your chest lightly to loosen up and trapped mucus. Sniff a peppermint inhaler (they are cheap). Then hold your nostrils closed and suck mucus into your mouth, while rotating your head in a circle, up and down, and side to side 3 times, then spit. This makes one spit very effective because sinuses and your body are 3-dimensional. I have found that spitting this way stops coughing and is much more efficient than simply spitting. Of course, gargle and rinse your mouth after spitting. Of course if you have less than a teaspoon of mucus in your mouth you can just swallow it. My spitting decision is 1/2 of a teaspoon.

How to blow your nose: (exercise, Mucinex, steam, sniffing fresh onion, peppermint inhalers, and marijuana all loosen up mucus.)

Drink something and hold the liquid in your mouth. Inhale peppermint. Then, hold one nostril closed and your mouth closed. Blow your nose several times, while you rotate your head and nod yes and no. Repeat with the other nostril. If nothing comes out, push a Kleenex up your nose and repeat until the Kleenex comes out fairly dry.

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Mark Shapiro, judgment expert, judgment broker, judgment writer, and a smile chaser.  Visit: http://www.JudgmentBuy.com  

Long Arm Statutes

What if your judgment debtor has a bank account in another state. Can you recover the judgment without domesticating the judgment to that other state? It might be possible because of long arm statutes.

A fifty-state PDF manual on long arm statutes can be found here:

http://euro.ecom.cmu.edu/program/law/08-732/Jurisdiction/LongArmSurvey.pdf

As an example,  Maryland's long arm statutes cover jurisdiction over a Colorado bank account of a judgment debtor reads:

"Respect to the Due Process Clause, which overall requires that Petitioner have maintained sufficient minimum contacts with the forum state, there must be “purposeful availment,” meaning there exists so substantial a connection between Petitioner and the forum state that having to defend a lawsuit there would be  foreseeable. In Maryland, a substantial connection will be established if Petitioner either engaged in significant activities in the State or created continuing obligations with the State’s residents, thus taking advantage of the benefits and protections of Maryland law.  In the instant case, however, Respondents have failed to demonstrate that CSR, in the course of any of its contacts with Maryland."

A  PDF court opinion on Maryland long arm statutes can be found here:

http://mdcourts.gov/opinions/coa/2009/129a08.pdf

"A federal court may exercise jurisdiction over a non-resident defendant if: (1) the requirements of the forum state's long-arm statute are satisfied; and (2) the exercise of jurisdiction comports with the Due Process Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment. Specifically, Maryland's long-arm statute provides that personal jurisdiction exists over anybody who transacts any business or performs any character of work or service in the State. MD. CODE ANN., CTS. & JUD. PROC. § 6-103(b)(1). The Court of Appeals has held that acts done within the State, which will support in personal jurisdiction as transacting "any business," include acts which constitute a purposeful activity within the State."

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Mark Shapiro, judgment expert, judgment broker, judgment writer, and a smile chaser.  Visit: http://www.JudgmentBuy.com  

Friday, February 24, 2017

Finding Relatives of your Judgment Debtor

Q)  Do you have any suggestions on the best place to locate the names of and to identify a judgment debtor's relatives?

A) When running down a debtor and/or his relatives, look at every court case they has ever been involved in:  State, Federal, Civil, Criminal, Probate, Family Law -check all of them. The same goes for records at the County Recorder. You will be surprised what you learn about your debtor and his family when you inspect the public records. Answers can often be found in the pleadings, declarations, on traffic tickets, in divorce decrees, etc.

Pinning down relatives is not always easy, particularly in cultures that interchange family names (mother's maiden name, etc.).  Try the probate court and search under name change cases.  You would be surprised how many people of Asian descent legally change their name.  Finding a name change case may help confirm who's who in the family tree.       

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Mark Shapiro, judgment expert, judgment broker, judgment writer, and a smile chaser.  Visit: http://www.JudgmentBuy.com  

Determining the value of a dead person's estate

When someone dies, their estate must pass through the legal process known as probate. During probate, assets of the estate are inventoried, (if assets permit) the creditors are paid, and the remaining assets (if any) are transferred to beneficiaries or heirs of the estate. As part of this process, all assets must be valued. Usually the value of the asset must be determined as of the date of death. Depending on the size of the estate, and the type of assets held by the estate, this can be a long and complicated process.

Real property is usually easy to value. You need to have a certified appraiser to provide the value and you must explain that you want a value for the date of death, not for today’s date.

Bank accounts and other financial accounts are also usually relatively easy to value. Talk to a bank representative to determine the value on a specific day, though as the value on a statement may include interest earned over the course of the month, and is not an actual date of death. Securities such as stocks are more complicated because the value of a stock can fluctuate significantly over the course of a day. The usual method of determining the value is to average the high and low values for the day in question. For the value of a bond, consult with a a bond broker. These are difficult to value without the assistance of a professional.

The decedent’s personal assets need to be valued. The easiest way to accomplish this is to hire a professional estate appraiser. Although it will cost money, it will save a lot of time and usually will prevent conflict regarding that value of personal items. Be careful with anything that may be a collectible or something unusual. You may need to take an item like that to a specialist for an appraisal. A collection of old toys, for example, may be worth a lot more than the average appraiser realizes.

If the decedent owned a business or a share in a business, you must hire professional(s) to come in and value the business.

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Mark Shapiro, judgment expert, judgment broker, judgment writer, and a smile chaser.  Visit: http://www.JudgmentBuy.com  

Tuesday, February 21, 2017

TLO is the best data service

I have heard from many judgment experts that TLO is the best data service
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Mark Shapiro, judgment expert, judgment broker, judgment writer, and a smile chaser.  Visit: http://www.JudgmentBuy.com  

Monday, February 20, 2017

New Simpler signup form for JudgmentBuy.com

The JudgmentBuy JB.PDF document has been shortened, simplified and updated.  The newest JB.PDF form is available at:  http://www.judgmentbuy.com/judgmentreferrals.html

JudgmentBuy.com is looking for expert judgment recovery pros and judgment buyers that buy or recover judgments in these states: (We already have judgment experts in these states, however most only take judgments larger than 30K, we are looking for experts that take smaller judgments); Arizona, Arkansas, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Hawaii, Iowa, Kansas, Maine, Maryland,  Mississippi, Montana,  New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Utah, Vermont, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin, and Wyoming.

If you are a judgment expert in these states, please check out
http://www.judgmentbuy.com/JudgmentPartners.html

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Mark Shapiro, judgment expert, judgment broker, judgment writer, and a smile chaser.  Visit: http://www.JudgmentBuy.com  

Saturday, February 18, 2017

Judgment Creditor Education Courses

At JudgmentBuy, we get a huge number of brand new judgment creditors that want to sell their judgments for cash upfront, however they have zero information about their judgment debtors. (Only a judgment debtor's available assets can repay any judgment.)

Of course, JudgmentBuy enlightens many of those creditors having zero debtor information, and we get a lot of judgments with the debtor information - so we find judgment buyers or judgment enforcers for them fast.

Many judgment enforcers will not take brand new judgments; and now I know why. This led me to an idea. If you go bankrupt, you are required to take at least one and often two, debtor education courses before your bankruptcy is granted. My idea is, if you go to court to get a judgment, you should be required to take and pass a judgment creditor education course before the judgment is granted.

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Mark Shapiro, judgment expert, judgment broker, judgment writer, and a smile chaser.  Visit: http://www.JudgmentBuy.com  

Friday, February 17, 2017

Bank Judgment Buyers

Judgment Buying - Against Banks?  JudgmentBuy now has an expert bank judgment buyer.

At JudgmentBuy, over about 15 years we have been sent many UCC liens against big banks, and must again now repeat, that UCC liens are NOT judgments.

UCC liens might be helpful in bankruptcy cases or be used as part of the evidence required to get a judgment.

At JudgmentBuy, over about 15 years, we have also been sent a few real judgments against banks (some of which were recovered on a contingency future-payment basis, others had debtor banks with teams of attorneys that vacated the judgment against them), and now have a bank judgment buying expert, who specializes in buying real money judgments against banks.

See:  http://www.judgmentbuy.com/BankJudgmentBuyers.html

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Mark Shapiro, judgment expert, judgment broker, judgment writer, and a smile chaser.  Visit: http://www.JudgmentBuy.com  

Thursday, February 16, 2017

With small judgments, maybe just record a lien

Q) I tried JudgmentMarketPlace.com to sell my $3,000 Michigan judgment; and the results were mostly tire kickers, and every judgment "buyer" there was a flake. Then I sent my judgment to you at JudgmentBuy.com, and you said no buyers will buy my judgment because "my judgment is too small, and my debtor owns no home and no job". Why won't anyone buy small judgments?

A) Every judgment buyer buys judgments only to later recover them. It costs money, often hundreds of dollars (or more) to recover a judgment, and sometimes the money spent is lost. That is why judgment buyers and judgment recovery experts usually do not take relatively tiny judgments, especially when the judgment debtor has no obvious available assets showing.

It is smart to simply record a judgment lien, and just wait for your debtor to (buy property, inherit property, or notice the lien on their credit report) with small judgments, when your debtor has no obvious available assets showing.

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Mark Shapiro, judgment expert, judgment broker,
judgment writer, and a smile chaser. Visit:  http://www.JudgmentBuy.com